Dagmar Vogt:
Sculpture "Woman in the Wheel, Beating the Wheel" (2016), Bronze

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Dagmar Vogt:
Sculpture "Woman in the Wheel, Beating the Wheel" (2016), Bronze

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https://www.arsmundi.com/en/artwork/skulptur-frau-im-rad-rad-schlagend-2016-bronze-872910.html
$ 3.645,60 (3.200,00 EUR)

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Short description

Limited, 18 copies | Serial unique piece | Signed | Bronze | Format 42 x 32 x 14 cm (H x W x D)

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Dagmar Vogt: Sculpture "Woman in the Wheel, Beating the Wheel" (2016), Bronze

Sculpture from bronze, 2016. Edition 18 copies, signed by hand. Each copy is a unique serial piece. Height 42 cm, width 32 cm, depth 14 cm.

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The work of Dagmar Vogt is characterized by the fusion of abstraction and objectivity, thematically connected with the decay of nature. Born in 1960 near Cologne, the artist captures the atmosphere of nature, with its mountains, lakes, and plants, in her relief-like and large-format works: "The cycle of life, nature, and its cycle are eternally new topics for me. "

There are series like "blooming and wilting" and "blossoms by the river," which look like fairytales, like moments of dreams - never clear, always blurred. The decay of the bright flowers seems to be visible through the abstracted painting style in a single moment. Dagmar Vogt works with many shades of a hue and makes several Vorskizzen.

She has received the training in painting and sculpture. Now the artist works and lives in Herdecke, Wuppertal and the Allgaeu, with artist greats Markus Luepertz and Mathias Lanfer. Dagmar Vogt is represented in galleries in Germany and New York.

An alloy of copper with other metals (especially with tin) used since ancient times.

Bronze casting:

When casting bronze, artist usually applies the lost-wax technique which is dating back more than 5000 years. It's the best, but also the most complex method of producing sculptures.

Sculpture "The Book Reader" by Ernst Barlachs is shown here as an example:

Ernst Barlach: Sculpture 'The book reader'

Ernst Barlach 'The Book Reader' - Lost Wax Casting Technique Part 1

First, the artist forms a model of his sculpture. It is embedded in a liquid silicone rubber composition. Once the material has solidified, the model is cut out. The liquid wax is poured in the negative mould. After cooling down, the wax casting is removed from the mould, provided with sprues and dipped into ceramic mass. The ceramic mass is hardened in a kiln, and the wax flows out (lost mould).

Ernst Barlach 'The Book Reader' - Lost Wax Casting Technique Part 2Now we finally have the negative form, into which the 1400 ° C hot molten bronze is poured. After the bronze had cooled down, the ceramic shell is broken off and the sculpture comes to light.

Ernst Barlach 'The Book Reader' - Lost Wax Casting Technique Part 3Now the sprues are removed, the surfaces are polished, patinated and numbered by the artist himself or, to his specifications, by a specialist. Thus, each casting becomes an original work

For lower-grade bronze castings, the sand casting method is often used which, however, does not achieve the results of more complex lost wax technique in terms of surface characteristics and quality.

Related links:
Sand casting