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Giovanni da Bologna: Sculpture "The Horse of the Medici" (1594), version in bronze

Giovanni da Bologna:
Sculpture "The Horse of the Medici" (1594), version in bronze

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Museums replica | Edition in bronze | Base: Marble | Height 26 cm | Length 22 cm

http://www.arsmundi.com/

Giovanni da Bologna: Sculpture "The Horse of the Medici" (1594), version in bronze

Full force and grace - a virtuosity masterpiece of a leading and influent mannerist sculptor. Giovanni da Bologna, court artist of Count Cosimo I. de Medici. Late renaissance, 16th century. Original: Liechtenstein, Count Collection. Edition in fine bronze. Hand cast using the lost wax technique. Height with marble base 26 cm. Length 22 cm.

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Giovanni da Bologna (1524-1608) called Giambologna was a master student of Michelangelo and the main representative of mannerism on the threshold between Renaissance and the early Baroque. His art presents the melting of influences of his motherland, Michelangelo’s works and antiquity. A lot of prominent masters, which came both from Italy and other countries studied in his workshop. The bronze and marble sculptures, as well as statues, made an important part of his works.

From 1544 to 1550 he was a student of Jacques Dubroeucq in Mons. A lot of other prominent masters, including some from Germany and his motherland Italy (Hans Reichel, Hubert Gerhard, Adriaen de Vries, Pierre Franqueville, Pietro Tacca and others) studied from that artist. The artist went to Florence and soon became the main sculptor at the Medici court.

The high nobility in the whole Europe tried to get some of his works in possession. The great number of works from the studio of Giambologna were unique. He was admitted to the Order of Christ by the Pope and was raised to the nobility by the emperor. Up to his death in 1608 he stayed at the service of Medici in Florence.

(Rebirth). Designation of art from about 1350 until the 16th century.

A state of mind that developed in Florence in the late 14th century that was retrospectively classified as rebirth of the classical ideals of Greek and Roman antiquity. During the 15th and 16th centuries, the Renaissance spread first over Italy and then all over Western Europe and determined the entire artistic creation. Such brilliant artists as Donatello, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Dürer, Holbein, Cranach and Fouquet created their immortal works by following the humanistic premises and putting a human being in the center of all thinking.

Renaissance experienced its heyday in literature through dramatic works and poems of William Shakespeare.

At the end of the 16th century, Renaissance had to make way to the luxury of baroque before its ideas had their rebirth in the classicism of the 18th century.

An alloy of copper with other metals (especially with tin) used since ancient times.

Bronze casting:

When casting bronze, artist usually applies the lost-wax technique which is dating back more than 5000 years. It's the best, but also the most complex method of producing sculptures.

Sculpture "The Book Reader" by Ernst Barlachs is shown here as an example:

Ernst Barlach: Sculpture 'The book reader'

Ernst Barlach 'The Book Reader' - Lost Wax Casting Technique Part 1

First, the artist forms a model of his sculpture. It is embedded in a liquid silicone rubber composition. Once the material has solidified, the model is cut out. The liquid wax is poured in the negative mould. After cooling down, the wax casting is removed from the mould, provided with sprues and dipped into ceramic mass. The ceramic mass is hardened in a kiln, and the wax flows out (lost mould).

Ernst Barlach 'The Book Reader' - Lost Wax Casting Technique Part 2Now we finally have the negative form, into which the 1400 ° C hot molten bronze is poured. After the bronze had cooled down, the ceramic shell is broken off and the sculpture comes to light.

Ernst Barlach 'The Book Reader' - Lost Wax Casting Technique Part 3Now the sprues are removed, the surfaces are polished, patinated and numbered by the artist himself or, to his specifications, by a specialist. Thus, each casting becomes an original work

For lower-grade bronze castings, the sand casting method is often used which, however, does not achieve the results of more complex lost wax technique in terms of surface characteristics and quality.

Related links:
Sand casting

The mold is usually taken directly from the original, so that the replica reproduces even the finest details. After casting the replica, using the most appropriate method, the surface is polished, patinated, gilded or painted according to the original.

A replica of ars mundi is a recognizable image of the original.

A plastic work of sculptural art made of wood, stone, ivory, bronze or other metals.

While sculptures from wood, ivory or stone are made directly from the block of material, for bronze casting a working model is prepared at first. Usually it is made of clay or other easily shaped materials.

The prime time of sculpture after the Roman antiquity was the Renaissance. Impressionism gave a new impulse to the sculptural arts. Also the contemporary artists, such as Jorg Immendorf, Andora, and Markus Lupertz enriched the sculpture with outstanding works.

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