Sculpture "Venus after the bath", bronze art

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Museum-replica | Bronze Art + marble | Handmade | Height 27 cm

http://www.arsmundi.com/

Sculpture "Venus after the bath", bronze art

No one has demand Cellini a statue with eight views, such virtuosity meets as Giovanni da Bologna.Original: National Museums in Berlin - Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation, Sculpture Collection.

Polymeric Ars Mundi museum replica, hand cast; with a bronze surface. Height incl. Marble base 27 cm.

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Giovanni da Bologna (1524-1608) called Giambologna was a master student of Michelangelo and the main representative of mannerism on the threshold between Renaissance and the early Baroque. His art presents the melting of influences of his motherland, Michelangelo’s works and antiquity. A lot of prominent masters, which came both from Italy and other countries studied in his workshop. The bronze and marble sculptures, as well as statues, made an important part of his works.

From 1544 to 1550 he was a student of Jacques Dubroeucq in Mons. A lot of other prominent masters, including some from Germany and his motherland Italy (Hans Reichel, Hubert Gerhard, Adriaen de Vries, Pierre Franqueville, Pietro Tacca and others) studied from that artist. The artist went to Florence and soon became the main sculptor at the Medici court.

The high nobility in the whole Europe tried to get some of his works in possession. The great number of works from the studio of Giambologna were unique. He was admitted to the Order of Christ by the Pope and was raised to the nobility by the emperor. Up to his death in 1608 he stayed at the service of Medici in Florence.

(Rebirth). Designation of art from about 1350 until the 16th century.

A state of mind that developed in Florence in the late 14th century that was retrospectively classified as rebirth of the classical ideals of Greek and Roman antiquity. During the 15th and 16th centuries, the Renaissance spread first over Italy and then all over Western Europe and determined the entire artistic creation. Such brilliant artists as Donatello, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Dürer, Holbein, Cranach and Fouquet created their immortal works by following the humanistic premises and putting a human being in the center of all thinking.

Renaissance experienced its heyday in literature through dramatic works and poems of William Shakespeare.

At the end of the 16th century, Renaissance had to make way to the luxury of baroque before its ideas had their rebirth in the classicism of the 18th century.

The Roman art is primarily determined by the fusion of Italian and Greek Hellenistic elements.

The pragmatic and political aspects serving to expand the empire were influential in architecture.

In religious sphere the early temples of Rome followed the Etrurian-Italic type. The Roman secular buildings, such as bridges, ports, aqueducts, walls, gates, etc. played far more important role.

With the transformation of the Roman Forum by Augustus and the redesign of the Forum of Augustus the significance of the old city centers changed. They became large closed outdoor spaces. Axial symmetry, oriented to a podium temple is characteristic of the time. The temples and theaters that were built in the "eternal city" under the reign of Emperor Augustus with their round dynamic designs diverged considerably from the straight-lined Greek models.

The copies and transformation of Greek models primarily predominate among the round, three-dimensional works of the Roman period. Independent achievements of Roman sculptors arose in the field of portraits, whereby in Rome, the form of the bust was preferred. A preference for ornamentation without neglecting the substantive content is shown in the relief art.

Triumphal paintings that were carried in processions to honor glorious commanders were typical for the painting. Such excavated cities of Vesuvius as Pompeii, Herculaneum, Stabiae and Oplontis provide the richest overview of mural painting.

A parallel to the painting is the art of mosaic which was mainly used for the decorative design of floors and walls.

Some areas of minor arts flourished exceedingly in Roman times. Toreutics, the art of working metal, brought forth precious silver vessels. The glassblowing art is documented by numerous excellent finds. In glyptik, (the art of carving on precious stones) there are magnificent reliefs carved from semi-precious stones, engraved gems and cameos depicting official themes.

The extensive coinage in Roman times contributed to spreading the portraits of the rulers over the entire territory of the Roman Empire.

Bronze powder bound by a polymer. By special polishing and patination techniques the surface of the casting gets a look that corresponds to the bronze.

The mold is usually taken directly from the original, so that the replica reproduces even the finest details. After casting the replica, using the most appropriate method, the surface is polished, patinated, gilded or painted according to the original.

A replica of ars mundi is a recognizable image of the original.

A plastic work of sculptural art made of wood, stone, ivory, bronze or other metals.

While sculptures from wood, ivory or stone are made directly from the block of material, for bronze casting a working model is prepared at first. Usually it is made of clay or other easily shaped materials.

The prime time of sculpture after the Roman antiquity was the Renaissance. Impressionism gave a new impulse to the sculptural arts. Also the contemporary artists, such as Jorg Immendorf, Andora, and Markus Lupertz enriched the sculpture with outstanding works.